How not to take product photos

I take very bad photographs. Not only is there likely to be a tree growing out of the top of absolutely anything that I photograph, but it will also be out of focus or fuzzy due to an involutary movement that takes hold of my arm at the moment the shutters close. Even when someone else is taking the pictures.

Honestly, it really is the dog not me.
It really is the dog moving, not me.

But Etsy and customers understandably want photos of the items they might want to buy. No problem for most people, right? All the crafting sites recommend you get your photographs done professionally. That’s one thing if each piece you make is worth £60 a time (or even if some of them are) but with lower cost products it’s a bit harder to negotiate.

The only remedy for my terrible photography is Instagram. It’s my only way of producing nonfuzzy, still shots that are in focus and are reasonably easy to compose nicely due to their square shape.

However, I do realise that a square shot in artificial light, filtered to an entirely different colour scheme, is not going to be adequate for any customer. Who would blame them? You need to be able to trust the image in a product shot.

So today I got my mum to come over with her trusty FinePix (yeah, I said I needed her help; I meant I needed her to do it for me :)) and we titted about with picture frames and handheld lights until we’d photographed more or less everthing in the portfolio.

Unfortunately, her cable has gone missing, so we couldn’t transfer the images straight away, so we have no idea what sort of quality the photos were.

I need a plan B, maybe urgently. This is going to be an ongoing problem.

Got a solution? Be a doll and drop me your suggestion below 🙂
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